Free Games

The Best Free Games of the Week

Tom Sykes at

Someone somewhere in some capacity probably once said that there's “no such thing as a free lunch”, but as everyone knows they were dead wrong because soup kitchens. If you substitute 'lunch' for 'games' they were even dead wronger, because there are free games coming out of the goddamn walls. We've scoured through all the Slender clones and zombie games to bring you the very best gratis games released over the past week or so. To put it another way: The Free Webgame Round-Up has levelled up. This week: slime, bobcats, vagabonds, knife parties and murder...murder most foul.


The Free Webgame Round-Up

Tom Sykes at

This week saw the return of *spit* Bubsy the Bubcat, but not quite in the way you may have been expecting. He's not the star of a misguided Kickstarter project - we've so far managed to avoid the likes of Zool and Cool Spot and Boogerman - but rather the hero of a fantastic indie platformy thing from the equally fantastic Arcane Kids. This week also features a lot of clicking, a lot of reading, a lot of dying repeatedly, and a lot of fun, free rogueliking - enjoy!


The Free Webgame Round-Up

Tom Sykes at

Fans of shapes are well catered for in this week's roundup, which features all your favourite geometric configurations: circles, rectangles...even the mythical 'triangle'. There's shapes shooting at each other, shapes just trying to fit in, and shapes obscuring deadly drops of doom. There's also a lightly harrowing adventure game and a prototype that sets out to be the antithesis of stealth - the latter featuring our old friend Mr Triangle. Enjoy!


Microtransactions: the good, the bad and the ugly

PC Gamer at

"Free-to-play" and "microtransactions" are dirty terms to some. That's understandable. Famous Facebook Skinner boxes like Farmville have clouded attitudes toward today's free-to-play games, and there's an assumption all microtransaction-driven game design is handicapped by the need to create ways to charge players. For some games, this is certainly true, but there are excellent free-to-play games out there that represent good value for money. Below we've assessed some of the most common methods used by free-to-play games to make money from players, and highlighted some of the fairest examples of free-to-play that are worth your time.


Path of Shadows: a free student-made stealth game, now available to download

Phil Savage at

Having ultimate control over the shadows sounds awesome, but in real life there aren't many practical applications to such a power. Yes, you could mess with sundial owners, but other than that? Pretty limited. In video games, it's a different matter. Just take the resurrected warrior from Path of Shadows, a student-made indie stealth game that is now available as a free download.


EA cancels Command & Conquer, devs admit to "not making the game you want to play"

T.J. Hafer at

EA's free-to-play Command & Conquer successor has been canceled during its closed alpha phase. A post on developer Victory Games' site points to community feedback as the primary reason for this decision. Polygon reports, via sources inside the studio, that the dev team is also being laid off.


The Free Webgame Round-Up

Tom Sykes at

By now you've probably cracked open Candy Box 2 and dined on the delicious lollypops within, so where do you turn to now for your browser-based, free gaming treats? You turn to The Free Webgame Round-Up, obviously, and to our weekly (mostly) collection of the best webgames around. This week: more Candy Box-style clicking, some 70s/80s-esque horror, turn-based shooting, pizza and a kingdom on a horse, not necessarily in that order.


The Free Webgame Round-Up

Tom Sykes at

Puzzles, puzzles, puzzles and...not-puzzles – it's a good week for webgames, particularly if you enjoy, y'know, puzzles. Escape Goat shows what happens when a goat and a mouse (and a magic hat) put their wits (and their stitching) together; Olav & The Lute asks you to solve puzzles with sound rather than by merging stuff; Puzzle Script, meanwhile, lets you create your own puzzle games relatively easily. When your brain's suitably worn out it's time to hike home from Burning Man...something far easier said than done. Enjoy!


The Free Webgame Round-Up

Tom Sykes at

This week's roundup is all about time. In TIMEframe, your time – in fact, the world's time – is slowly running out, while Speed Warp starts with 0 and goes from there. Other developers have toiled under the challenging conditions of the Indie Speed Run, to create memorable experiences in just 48 hours. It's been a particularly good week for browser games, all told, so be sure to make time in your busy schedule to get stuck in.


The Free Webgame Round-Up

Tom Sykes at

An isometric world gradually succumbing to the nothing. A deeper sleep. A nested multiverse and a psychopathic Pac-Man. Dun-dun. Dun-dun. Dun-dun dun-dun dun-dun dun-dun – it's a particularly good week for browser-based indie games, five of which we've collected for you below. Just don't go in the water, OK?


The 50 best free PC games

PC Gamer at

There might be no such thing as a free lunch, but there is certainly such a thing as free lunchtime entertainment. Over the following pages you’ll find a list of the best free indie games on PC – from 20-minute diversions to weekend-consuming, endlessly-expanded strategy epics.

All of the games on this list are free in their entirety. That means no microtransaction-supported free-toplay games and no shareware. We’ve also excluded ‘pay what you want’ games on the basis that developers who give you the ability to chip-in would probably like you to consider doing that. That said, there are always exceptions and you’ll find games on this list that sit in a grey area – normally where there’s a substantial free version with the option of also buying an upgraded paid edition. In these cases, we’ve gone with our hearts. Which is to say that we argued about it for hours.


The Free Webgame Round-Up

Tom Sykes at

You've all played SuperHot, yes? Then we can begin. This week's roundup features a utopian paradise, a very punchy sailor, and a couple of dancing secret agents, among other things. Unless it turns out this was all some sort of daymare, you can join me to hear more after the break.


The Free Webgame Round-Up

Tom Sykes at

This week's roundup is a particularly gorgeous one, and not just because of my recent cosmetic surgery. (After much deliberation I opted for the rhinoplasty – I'm now primarily encountered in the African outback.) Beautiful glitches, garish peoplescapes, a cute wickle bunny rabbit and more await your peepers after the break.


The Free Webgame Round-Up

Tom Sykes at

Continuing last week's theme of games either disappearing or not working by the time I come to try them, I wasn't able to play Cookie Clicker in time for this week's roundup, but I've just had a quick go and it's bloody wonderful in a Candy Box/A Dark Room sorta of way. So play that! But also stick around for another collection of cracking confectionary, which this week is brought to you by the letter, I dunno, Q. Enjoy!


The Free Webgame Round-Up

Tom Sykes at

Well I was going to include Space Email in this week's roundup, but the novel communication experiment was taken offline before I got the chance, thanks to internet jerks once again ruining everything they touch. It's not all bad news though - this bankest of holidays will be enlivened with the likes of Eastward Quest, Robot Planet, Socrates Jones (think Phoenix Wright for philosophy) and a game that uses the pause button to startling effect. Enjoy!


The Free Webgame Round-Up

Tom Sykes at

Typing. Invisible objects. A form of echolocation. A be-hatted Minecraft creator pitting zombie against man. Nightmares. Knightmares. That Sort of Thing. All that and more awaits in this week's Free Webgame Roundup, which as you may have guessed collects the very best in browser-based entertainment, saving you the trouble of wading through those muddy, muddy waters for yourself. Enjoy!


Fan-made Starcraft MMO gets a Kickstarter

T.J. Hafer at

StarCraft Universe, the fan-made MMO under development using the StarCraft II engine, is now on Kickstarter with Blizzard's blessing. The team, Upheaval Arts, is asking for $80,000 to fund the free-to-play project, with stretch goals that can add playable zerg, new PvP content, and an extension of the original storyline being developed.


The Free Webgame Round-Up

Tom Sykes at

Self-aware triangles, the thought police, real-time chess – reality is falling apart at the seams in our regular webgame roundup, which this week is brought to you by [OUR GLORIOUS LEADER]. Click on for rebellious isosceles, stacks of minigames, a randomly generated roguey adventure and a revitalised board game classic (not Kerplunk). Enjoy!


EverQuest Next interview: no grinding, no leveling, and a maybe on Frogloks

Tyler Wilde at

Forget about smashing voxel castles for a second—that's crazy, but EverQuest Next is also kicking down the pillars of its own D&D foundation. SOE is changing fantasy MMO tropes it helped define and which its fans are used to—we're talking getting rid of traditional leveling and introducing a multiclassing system, as well as handling expansions with Rallying Calls, which are grand scale, multistage storylines that permanently change a server's world. These aren't totally new RPG ideas, but they sure are for EQ.


EverQuest Next Landmark, a free-to-play voxel building game, coming this winter

Tyler Wilde at

EverQuest Next's entire environment—hills, forests, deserts, and cities—will be made of voxels, little bits of matter which can be smashed apart by explosive spells and giant Golems. Before we start breaking things, though, SOE wants us to start building—the developer is announcing today that it will be sharing its voxel building tools in EverQuest Next Landmark, a separate free-to-play MMO going into beta before the end of the year.