Crusader Kings II

Crusader Kings Chronicle, part 1: 1066 - 1076 A.D.

T.J. Hafer at

Forbidden texts

December, 1068: Duke Murchad comes across a strange book...

To be honest, I haven't played CK2 long enough to have the slightest idea what these events do. So, by default, I'm always going to pick the more radical option and see what happens. Worst-case, I summon some kind of elder horror that sweeps all Ireland into the sea. And if that's not actually a possibility... your move, modders.

Meanwhile, Duchess Alfhild is found pregnant with hers and Murchad's second child.

April, 1069: After long study, Duke Murchad decides the book is a madman's ramblings.

So, no elder horrors or even minor heresies. That's a little anticlimactic, but I did pick up the Scholar trait. Not as exciting, but better for the realm than the alternative.

The pages have barely begun to settle when Murchad gets word that his half-brother, Lorcán, has died of natural caueses at 40. His wife and two sons join in the grieving of his passing, and a search begins for someone new to mind Munster's coffers.

My half-brother was a fine steward, and our treasuries were the better for him. Oh, and I guess he was a nice guy, too. To my chagrin, it seems the once-rebel Earl Muiredach is the next best man for the job, and I give him Lorcán's old seat on my council grudgingly.

April, 1069: Murchad's third son, and second by Alfhild, is born. He is named Amalgaid, and along with his brother Donnchad, efforts are made to find him a worthy betrothal.

It seems the right time to betroth my two younger sons. I had been holding off on this since they stand to inherit if Brian dies childless, but Toirrdelbach is taking his sweet, ever-loving time fabricating my claim on Connacht, and I'd like to be king before I'm dead and buried. For Donnchad, I've selected Órlaith nic Diarmait, daughter of Duke Diarmait of Leinster. For Amalgaid, I've selected Der-Lugdach nic Áed, daughter of Earl Áed of Breifne.

In both cases, a marriage will allow me to press a claim on an Irish county, but not until both bride and groom reach the age of 16, and can be formally married. If I can win either of these counties, I can declare myself Duke of its constituent duchy, and holding two duchies is the next step on the road to being able to proclaim myself High King of Ireland. It will also assure more pure, Irish blood in my family line, with both Donnchad and Amalgaid being half Norwegian.